7 Things to Do After Landing in the USA as an International Student

Now that you have completed the arduous application process, you’ve been accepted to your dream school in the United States and you have received a visa. The next step as an international student is to begin your new life as an expat. As you will be living in the U.S. for some time, there are things that you need to do once you arrive so that you can feel at home when moving forward with the rest of your life. There are several details that are required by the U.S. government and universities where you will be studying; however, don’t let this intimidate or stress you out. You can find all of these documents online or ask your university for assistance; just keep in mind that some of these things need to be done sooner than later!

 

Check-in with your school

First things first, it’s important to touch base with your university. Check-in with the school where you will be studying so you can receive critical information and advice about living in the U.S. You will want to know things like what public transportation is like in the city, how much a cup of coffee costs and how you can take care of your health. You will also want to let them know when you expect to arrive so that they can schedule a meeting with a representative as soon as possible. You’ll want to check in with the university both verbally and via email so that you have a record of the information that you’ve been given; this will help you stay organized, especially when moving forward with the rest of your life. 

Register for an Accent Reduction Class

As an international student, effective communication in English is paramount to your success both academically and socially. To boost your English speaking skills and ensure you’re easily understood, consider registering for an Accent Reduction Class. These specialized courses focus on honing your pronunciation and intonation to sound more like a native English speaker. Not only will this improve your overall communication, but it also aids in building confidence when interacting with peers, professors, and others in your new environment. This step might be especially valuable if you’re aiming for comprehensive immersion in the American culture and lifestyle.

Get a U.S. Bank Account

Many countries don’t have traditional banks that are open during regular business hours on weekends and holidays, which can make cashing checks difficult. Additionally, banks in other countries often charge high monthly service fees and have strict regulations, which can make maintaining a bank account challenging. In the U.S., on the other hand, many banks have no monthly service fees and have a large network of ATMs across the country. Additionally, many banks offer online banking that is accessible 24/7. You will want to get a checking account that does not charge monthly service fees, and make sure that the bank you choose has ATMs in your area. If you get a student bank account, make sure that it is an account that doesn’t charge monthly service fees. You will want to get a bank account as soon as you arrive in the U.S. so you can cash checks, pay your bills and have a clear place to deposit your money.

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Get Health Insurance

Health insurance is a necessity when living in the U.S., and it can protect you from high medical bills if you get sick or injured. Make sure that you get health insurance as soon as you arrive in the country. While some universities do have health insurance plans for their students; these plans usually don’t kick in until several months after you have started your studies. The time to sign up for health insurance is when you first arrive in the U.S. You will have to provide proof of your insurance as part of the government’s requirements for visa holders. The best time to sign up for health insurance is while you are still abroad. It will take you a while to find an insurance plan that you like, and you may want to shop around for the best deals.

 

Register with the U.S. government

If you plan to stay in the U.S. for more than 90 days, you will need to register with the U.S. government. This is a quick, easy and free process that can be completed online. There are three things you will need to do as part of this process: 1. Get an SSN – You will need to apply for a social security number online. The application is free, and you can do it as soon as you arrive in the U.S. 2. Get health insurance – You will need to provide proof that you have health insurance. You can do this by uploading a copy of your insurance card or policy to the government website. 3. Get a bank account – You will need to provide proof that you have a bank account. You can do this by uploading a picture of your checking account balance.

 

Get a cell phone and Internet plan

Whether you’re communicating with your friends back at home or your new classmates, having a cell phone and Internet connection is a necessity in today’s digital world. While you can get a cell phone and Internet plan while you are studying abroad, it is best to do so as soon as you arrive in the U.S. This way, you can test out the service and make sure that it works in the area where you will be living. Keep in mind that you may need to update your address with your cell phone service provider and Internet company. You will also want to make sure that your phone and Internet plan fits your needs; this may include the amount of data that you have access to or the types of minutes and text messages that you have available.

 

Find a place to live

Finding a place to live as an international student is tricky. You’re looking for a place to live that is affordable, close to your university, and has good public transportation. You’ll want to explore your city or university to find out what’s available. You can search online for available apartments in your area, stop by your local university’s housing office and talk with your fellow international students to find out where they are staying. It’s important to start looking for a place to live as soon as you arrive in the U.S. This allows you time to find a place that’s right for you and your budget. There are many websites where you can search for available apartments in your area, such as Craigslist and Padmapper. Your university may also have a housing office that you can visit.

 

Get an International Driving License

In the United States, it is illegal to drive without an international driver’s license. Once you get your license, you will need to let your state’s Department of Motor Vehicles know that you have it so that you can be properly registered to drive. You will need to get an international license before you arrive in the U.S. You can either take a driver’s test in your home country or take a driver’s test in the U.S. once you arrive. If you take the test in your home country, you will need to send your certificate to the Department of Motor Vehicles in the state where you will be living.

Things to Do After Landing in the USA as an International Student

Final Step: Celebrate!

Congratulations! You’ve made it through all the red tape, completed all the necessary forms, and have found a place to live in the United States. As you embark on this new journey and learn English speaking, take a moment to relish in your achievements. Once all the items on your checklist are complete, you can relax and embrace your new life. This is a prime opportunity to reach out to friends and family back home, sharing your adventures and reaffirming your goal of studying abroad. The U.S. offers a plethora of activities and events throughout the year worth exploring. From fall football games in local universities to winter New Year’s celebrations in major cities like New York or Las Vegas, and cultural festivals in the spring, there’s always something to look forward to.

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